The Facebook 15 Authors Meme

I’ve been tagged twice for this on Facebook. Maybe after I finish up here I’ll figure out how to do it there.

You’re supposed to write a list of 15 authors who have influenced you and will always stick with you. Part of the directions: “Don’t take too long to think about it…”List the first fifteen you can recall in no more than 15 minutes.”

Oh no, honey. Thinking is what I do!

1. Ayn Rand- There are so many reasons her work will always stick with me. Reading her fiction, and The Romantic Manifesto…well, she changed my life in some ways. The way I think, my ability to cope with some of the crazy I see around me–I don’t want to get too into that stuff. As a writer, she helped me understand the concept of Hero in a way that reading a few hundred romance novels hadn’t quite done yet. And she helped me see the usefulness in the character arcs of secondary players. Perhaps most of all, she taught me that a great novel is more than just a story. A great novel is about something, and the concept of theme is not something that should be left behind in High School English class.

2. Johanna Lindsay- I read the few dozen of her historical romances that were available when I was a teen. At that time, Harlequin was very tame and pretty much PG. Lindsay’s books were my first exposure to the rated R world of adult romance. While I think those books probably did more for my interest in costuming, sewing, and medieval housekeeping than the writing stuff–because historical = research = OMG no–I definitely got stuff from all the Lindsays. The way she could pull out and develop secondary characters to star in later books, the humorous interactions between characters who are close to each other, ideas about what makes for likable characters and what can redeem a character or what appears to be a bad or doomed relationship, an understanding that there’s a structure beneath romances and fiction in general.

3. Nora Roberts- I came to Nora kind of late in my reading. I’m not really sure why. Some things I learned from Nora: Characters don’t always have to be orphans to be likable; sometimes family or close friends really add dimension to the story and even make some of the writing a lot easier. Which leads to the next point, the hero and heroine don’t have to exist alone together, in a vacuum, for the entire story. It’s ok to try new things: straight contemporary, suspense, girlfriend stories, family sagas, paranormal, science fiction–and still have it be romance at the heart of it. I also learned a lot about series metaplot from reading her trilogies.

4. Shannon McKenna- She’s not a big name, but man, can she write some heroes. These are probably classified as erotic romantic suspense. They’re definitely romantic suspense, but there’s a lot of sex and it’s pretty hot. McKenna’s heroes are amazing in the same way as Suzanne Brockmann’s Navy Seals–only I think they’re even better. They’re these over-the-top Alpha males on the outside, with this creamy center of insecurity and desperation when it comes to the heroines. I think I’ve understood attraction to a flawed hero from my teens and the bodice-ripper novels, but McKenna showed me how to appreciate weaknesses.

5. Linda Howard- She’s great at coming up with story concepts. In a romance, you know the characters are going to be together at the end of the story. Howard makes me want to know how. She’s also great at choosing elements that eventually come together as scenes that move me. And that’s what I want from fiction: I want to be moved.

6. JR Ward- Who doesn’t love the Black Dagger Brotherhood? Her heroes have that same ultra-Alpha on the surface, but kind of messed up and in need of TLC quality that you now know I’m into. Another thing I get from Ward: be brave. She’d gotten plenty of criticism about her use of language, her names, her creative spelling, deus ex machina endings, but hey, I’ll bet the piles of money soften the blows. This is her world, she’s running it. People claim to be annoyed with this or that, but she stays true to her world and ultimately they keep reading because she’s just that good. She makes me want to be that good.

7. Kate Forsyth- Here’s an author who just made me want to create a fantastic world, and to people it with a cast of heroic characters in an epic struggle. Fantasy isn’t always easy for me to read, but this world was just so incredibly rich, the storylines so amazing, the characters so wonderful…And as to that, the villains were so well developed. Can’t say enough about these books–certainly I shouldn’t say “so” again.

8. L. Neil Smith- The Probability Broach is an amazing book. While as a writer, this was one of the books made me want to write libertarian fiction (but for girls), I think it’s always going to stick with me as the first time I was able to read about anarchy without simply dismissing it.

9. Laurell K. Hamilton-Her early work made me want to write a kick-ass heroine, and the change in her work made me really appreciate how much I loved the early voice that she lost. Part of the delight for me in the first few Anita Blake books, was the freshness of Anita’s voice, the unexpected Dr. Seuss references, that kind of thing. She was part of waking me up to the power of voice.

10. Janet Evanovitch- Stephanie Plum: not the most kick-ass girl I’ve ever met, and she showed me the power of creating a character who had some room to grow, someone readers could identify with and really root for. Evanovitch is another one for amazing voice. So much about One for the Money makes me smile just because it reminds me of home, of people I feel I’m familiar with. She made me want to sound, not like a writer, not like an amalgamation of all the books I’ve ever read, but as the me I am in my head and with my friends.

11. Anne McCaffrey- I don’t think you can spend any time in Pern without being touched by it.Not only did I fall hard for Lessa, kick-ass, underdog heroine, not only was I drawn in hard by the relationship between Lessa and F’Lar, but the storyline and the world-building were incredible. After the first books, going backward in time to see how it started, and then filling in the gaps in the history of the world–it just blew my mind.

12. Diana Gabaldon- Look, Outlander was the only one I could read, but it’s not going anywhere. Jamie, his capacity for bravery and sacrifice, but also the innocent sweetness of him, is always going to stick with me.

13. Harlequin- The retired Harlequin Gothic and later Harlequin Intrigue lines pumped out romantic adventures every month that even a babysitter could afford, and then dream on. These books replaced the YA I had been reading partly because they could ALWAYS be counted on to be about the romance. I guess this was when I really started to understand about commercial genres, and really started to get serious about penning my own romances. There was a lot to be learned from these, and a lot of it was about what not to do, but that’s no less important. I learned what I like in a story and in characters, what works for me as a reader and what doesn’t, and I found some authors and stories for my keeper shelf.

14. Debra Webb- is one author I found through Harlequin Intrigue. I loved her Colby series, about a private detective agency. In addition to being good stories, very well written, I learned a lot and started to get ideas about how I might one day structure books in a series. I learned about spinoffs, plots that carry over several books, using an epilogue for good (instead of to annoy me).

15. I know we all love books, but, to me, fiction is fiction. Often I think we should do a better job of learning the names of the writers behind the television and movies that really stick with and influence us. Obviously, Joss Whedon’s work is huge for me, but there’s no way he can do all that alone, and I feel like I should know more names in this category. A few random shows that have caught at my imagination: Buffy, La Femme Nikita, V, Battlestar Galactica (1978), Battle of the Planets (G-Force), Superfriends, Batman, Thundar the Barbarian, X-Men, Wonder Woman, He-Man, Dungeons and Dragons (animated, 1983), Days of Our Lives, Santa Barbara, Voltron, Veronica Mars, 90210, Firefly…

So…take on the meme if you want, but I’d love it you’d share your thoughts on any of the above, or if you’d like to share one or two of your own favorites, and what they’ve meant to you.

20 Comments

Filed under books, characters, ideas, love, me me me, romance, story structure, writing

20 responses to “The Facebook 15 Authors Meme

  1. Andrew Mocete

    When I wrote the book I’m editing I thought a lot about the Stephanie Plum series. Her characters are so well written, that they could all be stars of their own books.

    Agree on #15, fiction is fiction. I’m that guy that searches the credits for the writers and for a long time as a kid I couldn’t understand why the writer didn’t get the most praise. “There’d be nothing to direct or act in without the writer!” Actually I still don’t get it.

    Check out Warehouse 13. It’s a great show with a kind of Whedon-ness to it.

    • Warehouse 13 added to Q: check.

      “When I wrote the book I’m editing…”

      And when are we going to get to read??

      (#15: It’s like when you watch a movie like Terminator. And then you watch Terminator 2. And then you go: what the heck happened? Yes, a boy and his robot– that’s exactly what made my heart beat faster. No! “I came across time for you, Sarah.” That’s the shit, and that came from the script, not the special effects studio. /tangent)

      • Andrew Mocete

        I hope someone gets to read it soon. This was a NaNo book and after epic procrastination I read it. Although I liked the story, 99% of it needs a rewrite. The page numbers came out great. Lesson learned? NaNo is a no no for me.

        Once it’s done I’ll be looking for CPs, betas and an editor.

        ps-Excellent tangent use.

  2. Totally love this post! Also, I love how you expanded the meme to include explanations of your choices. :)

    I recently added Outlander to my TBR list. I was a bit daunted when I realized just how many novels there are in that series, and how long they are, but I’m very excited to read. Interesting to hear that it’s on your list!

    And yes, fiction of all types is important. I think it’s as essential for writers to watch television shows, watch movies, attend plays, etc., as it is to read widely and outside the genres they write. You can learn a lot from looking at stories in lots of different ways and through lots of different mediums. Excellent point, my friend. :) And excellent post!

    • Thank you! I read the beginning of the second book in the Outlander series, but Gabaldon is not a romance author and doesn’t follow romance rules. Outlander was hard enough for me, so I decided I wasn’t going to follow those characters anymore. I put them into a HEA in my head and just let them live there. But with that first book, my Jamie-love was so intense that when I moved and had my books in storage, I had to go to Barnes & Noble and sneak some peeks to visit him again.

  3. Yay, someone else who knew and loved the animated D&D series! I thought it was just my sister and I. :)

    I didn’t know what I was going to blog about today until I read tour Tweet with this link. I think I know, now. ;)

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  5. Mmm, Jamie Fraser… seriously, though, those novels are so chock full of every other thing I love – they’re literary, historical, humourous, medical, and romantic – that I’d really recommend reading the whole series. And the books about another of the characters, Lord John. He’s got his own romances going on…

    • See, if he’s got “romances” going on? I’m way too romance-bound in my reading tastes for that to sound good. In some ways she reads like epic fantasy to me, which I sometimes like and sometimes have to hurl at the wall. Not because there’s anything wrong with them, just that personal taste thing.

  6. Hey Susan,
    I was being overly coy – Lord John is gay! His books are more romance and mystery mixed together.
    Fwiw, mine’s a pure romance [g] At least I hope so – I’m not 100% sure I’ve followed all the rules of the genre…

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